Alice Kuder

REALTOR®

Home Styles:  Contrast and Comparison

 

Each home style has its own particular advantages and disadvantages.  This chart is designed to help you determine which style best meets your particular needs and circumstances.

 

Characteristics

Single Family Rez

Townhome

Condominium

Co-op

Yard/Garden

Commonly

Possibly

Seldom

Seldom

Privacy

Most

Some

Least

Least

HOA-upkeep

None

Rarely

Yes

Yes

HOA dues

No

No

Yes

Yes

CC&R?s

No

Minimal

Yes

Yes

Proximity to neighbors

Varies

Close by

Very close

Very close

Amt. of Property Tax

Proportional

Proportional

Pd. by HOA

Pd. by HOA

Sewer capacity charges

Rarely

Often

Occasionally

Rarely

Noise level

Varies

Varies

Varies

Varies

Security thru proximity

Possibly

Good

Maximal

Maximal

Maintenance

DIY

DIY

Provided

Provided

Resale value

Varies

Varies

Varies

Varies

High density

Rarely

Yes

Yes

Yes

Rural

Possibly

Rarely

No

No

Suburban

Possibly

Possibly

Possibly

Rarely

Urban

Possibly

Usually

Usually

Usually

Multi-level

Possibly

Usually

Often

Possibly

Potential for expansion

Often

Rarely

Rarely

Rarely

Garage

Often

Possibly

Possibly

Possibly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home Styles Defined

 

Single Family Residence:  any free-standing home, designed to house a single family, that does not share walls with another building.

 

Townhome:  rather than being a legal term, ?townhome? actually refers to a style of home, which may or may not be a condominium.  Townhomes typically share one or more walls with neighboring units, but do not have other units above or below them.  Townhome complexes, as the term is most commonly used today, do not have Homeowners? Associations, nor any Homeowner dues.  They may, however, have a limited set of CC &R?s (Covenants, Codes and Restrictions) set up by the builder.

 

Condominium:  a building in which owners purchase individual units and jointly own common areas such as a parking garage and courtyard.  Owners pay dues to a Homeowners Association, which then pays for the maintenance and upkeep of the building and grounds.  Condo owners are obliged to abide by the particular CC & R?s enacted by the owners themselves and enforced by the Homeowners? Association.  Condominium owners may or may not own the land underneath their unit.

 

Co-op (cooperative housing project):  occupants own shares in a corporation, rather than the actual living units.  Members share the costs of maintaining the building and grounds, including property taxes and insurance.